School Experiments Show Students The Impact Of Not Washing Their Hands

School Experiments Show Students The Impact Of Not Washing Their Hands

A pair of elementary educators know that their recent experiments with moldy bread successfully taught their students to wash their hands regularly with warm water and soap when they receive strange reactions.

Dayna Robertson, 38, and behavioral expert Jaralee Metcalf, 23, conducted one-month research with special education students at Discovery Elementary School, Idaho, which showed the effects of germ-filled hands-on bread. Metcalf posted the results on Facebook with pictures of stale, dark bread that were touched or wiped on the classroom laptops by the hands of all students, while the clean-looking bread was splashed with water and soap. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported last week that influenza movement in the United States is on the rise this year with an estimated 2.6 million reported cases, and 23,000 people were hospitalized. The classroom experiment began on 4th November 2019, when Robertson wrapped five different kinds of bread in ziplock bags immediately after contact to prevent air from having a significant impact on the molding. One hand was touched with unwashed hands, the other hand was touched with liquid soap, the other hand was washed with warm water and soap, and the other hand was rubbed on a Chromebook laptop of the same type. Robertson was treated with gloves to avoid nakedness. Hand. After a month, the results were noticeable. The bread that has been rubbed on a Chromebook is almost black and disintegrates, while the bread touched by dirty hands follows, and the bread with hand sanitizer has its mold. These students range in age from kindergarten to sixth grade. They regularly wipe Chromebooks, but they use Chromebooks that have not been cleaned recently.

Such experiments can be conducted nationwide in all classrooms to get more and better results. Many teachers and professors are giving a positive response to the post that went viral on Metcalf’s profile.